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're looking at relatively flattish trade here in europe on christmas eve. let's recap off of what we've seen in asia in the overnight session here. you're looking at slight gains across the board. the shanghai composite up by .25%. you're seeing similar gains in the s&p asx and the hang seng, the kospi both a couple of points up to the upside, as well. currency markets, pretty stable trade, too. we're seeing slightly lower volumes to say the least as you would anticipate here during the holiday days. we are, though, flirt, a recent high is 1.32. a couple of sessions ago, we were down at the 1.29 mark. aussie/dollar flat. sterling seeing slight gains. just to wrap things up showing you what's taking place in fixed income, relatively flattish trade, as well. the yield here on the spanish yield, 5.3%. the uk seeing yeldz slightly higher, as well. but, of course, it is christmas. it is the holiday season that we're up against. so you would anticipate that maybe some investor res closing out recent profits. sitting tight and waiting for that next year to start, karen. >> thanks very much, louisa.
, the financial crisis in europe is providing an opportunity for china. earlier this year, we heard from new york times reporter liz alderman on a chinese shipping company that is making waves in greece. > > how successful has this shipping company, known as cosco, been so far in greece? > > it's an interesting story. this chinese basically state- run shipping company came in here about three years ago in a $500 million deal that ever since then has been a model for the country, because what they did is they bought half of piraeus port, which is an ancient port in greece and one of the most important ports in the southern mediterranean. what they did was they basically took an operation that had been effectively lagging under greek ownership and completely turned it around. > > have the the greek people been welcoming of this? the chinese work way is much different from the european way, let's say. > > the chinese have an extremely efficient working practice. as one spokesman there put it to me, they basically run their business by showing that they work 24/7, that has actually rung alarm bells,
in europe compared to america? is that just an example of you were disciplined in europe and you got a lot of business? i'm trying to understand. europe is harder right now than america. >> exactly. that underscores the point that what we do nobody else can do. we want to make the offer when your wallet is out of your pocket not six months after you leave the store. you can go look in the filing cabinet that oracle or s.a.p. or microsoft has and that's the 20th century. we're all about doing things in realtime. we make you that offer when your wallet is out and your credit card is in your hand. nobody else can do that. that's a universal big data realtime problem that only tibco can solve. >> you mentioned oracle and s.a.p. and analysts that i checked in with say that ibm has come on very strong. >> ibm is our strongest competitor. we beat them every single time in terms of technical performance. they do have strong relationships and at the end of the day we have to be three years ahead of the competition and we believe we are. >> okay. you had 25 deals that were over 1 million. last year
, so how will he foot the bill? is a fat tax like the one that they have in europe the way to do it? a vat tax? a value added tax? is that story coming up next. how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combining your customized charts with leading-edge analysis tools from recognia so you can quily spot key trends and possible entry and exit points. we like this idea so much that we've applied for a patent. i'm colin beck of fidelity investments. our integrated technical analysis is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >> when you start talking about an issue of treatment of mental illness, the mentally ill should they have access to guns? well, there is a rational response that most americans have somebody who is not thinking clearly should not have a gun in their hands. but how do you define and that codify that into law? that's a much trickier issue. david: that was scott rasmussen with the latest poll on gun control and do
is gloria. i come from europe. everybody talks about [indiscernible] most of us [indiscernible] we are the only ones that can produce babies. i was wondering with the crazy schedule you mentioned working until midnight how you balance family time and a career. the mother is the most important role in the family and for the child. the child is the future of everything we're talking about. how can a woman in the united states be independent with a career if she has had a child with no maternity leave? united states is way behind most other countries. they have maternity leave. there should not be fair when she goes to an interview -- there should not be fear when going to an interview. >> does anyone want to take that? >> i would be happy to do that. >> i have always gotten up at 4:30 or 5:00. i have a son. he is grown of now. when i get up, he is off living his life. my husband and i have always been in similar careers. that really helps a lot. over the years, i made choices on what i would do in order to create the flexibility for me to raise our son. i do think that is very import
because of logistical problems, because of strategic priority, as i say europe first, china second, it was pretty low. one very good indicator was our -- [inaudible] you. over 60% is commonwealth countries. somewhere among 25 went to soviet union. during the entire war, less than 2% went to china. so you see, china was very important, but in terms of material support was very small. that was very ironic. has lot to do with rivalry, policy, priorities, logistical difficulties. but overall it's national policy, very important. the time he of course doesn't work the chinese way because americans don't decide to go back to asia. >> how many chinese died during world war ii? >> the numbers vary. the most accepted number during the seven years, eight years of war, remember world war ii lasted a lot longer in china, was 15 million. >> 15 million? >> 50 million. >> that's on par or close to what the soviet union lost? >> soviet union lost more. anymore concentrated way because stalin -- german policy and eastern front, the other area. >> japan lost -- >> most of these 50 million casualties
and the greenback. and boasted in one day she made $200,000 europe was booming minks were giving easy money at low interest rate and prices were rising and they were buying the bonds because they pay high interest rates. but the prices are so high they reached a level where nobody could afford them they could not buy the bonds of day with some of them. 80 percent was on by the europeans. then they went into bankruptcy and the bank had to close. know more customers for the railroad bond edberg and hetty had to come back to america. this city had burgeoned with tense story buildings central part stretch north and a brownstone houses replaced the shanties and apartment houses appeared for the first time. the largest bookstore in the world, patrick's touched this guy the metropolitan museum of art opened in the museum of natural history. the exuberant spending was no different from the unfettered expansion from industrial on to procurers, promoters and real estate speculators. from 1873 the financial panic flat and the country into despair. does that sound familiar? and the stocks bounced up and down.
arabia, ecuador, all over europe. >> dear santa claus, my only have gabriella better. clerk learned their 9-year-old daughter had a brain tumor. to the make a wish foundation, she gets to travel to paris. but before going, this fourth had a selfless epiphanies. she asked for letters to santa claus because macy's donates a make a wish for letter the department receives. >> it might have felt really lonely otherwise. >> they blew past their goal of tens thousand. became 150,000, which more into more than to hundred thousand letters. afternoon, it took a moving company to deliver to macy's this avalanche of love. >> it's pretty incredible. despite arduous chemotherapy and radiation treatments, she was there for the remarkable announcement, the final total. 240,983 letters. make a wish has really touched me. >> the treatments altered her can hear herou strength in every word. we might have a bad day to day, but there's always a bright tomorrow. thank you. happy holidays. >> and i did ignited in a little aroundledrt with thed returned gift of hope.difficul macy's was so touched by the ha
to ship it from the gulf coast up to new york. you can actually ship it overseas to west africa or europe for probably a fraction of that. so even though the northeast is a little bit tight on gasoline, it costs so much to ship in u.s. vessels right now that some of the gasoline that might ordinarily come to the other parts of the country is going to places like nigeria, asia, europe, you name it, and that's unusual and it has to do with a shortage of american flag vessels. dagen: i'm surprised politicians aren't talking about that. but instead they are trying to deal with the tax increases and spending cuts. if they don't get a deal done on that, will we see any impact in the crude and also the gasoline markets? >> oh, absolutely. if the fiscal cliff, if we go off of it, i think we will see crude oil prices come down substantially. my thought is though if we don't do that, if we have a short-term fix, that you will see a lot of hot money come back into the market and park itself in commodities and oil is always a favorite. so if you're rooting for the fiscal cliff, you might be rooting f
all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the house and senate, we would get a mainstream deal. >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tr
, the mercury hit 20.7 celsius, a record. a similar picture elsewhere in central europe, having an impact on how people celebrate christmas. >> these icicles are fake, just like the polar bears. a real winter wonderland would melt in the blazing sun of the atlantic coast. people are just. there holiday activities to suit the weather. >> it is wonderful weather for this season. usually it is cold. >> experiencing unseasonable sunshine. flocking to beer gardens and parks for a different take. >> we are not getting a christmas tree this year. it is better to just sit in the garden and enjoy things. >> switzerland is reporting record temperatures as well. these have shed their winter coats for a cool dip. this christmas, the only snow will be on the mountain tops. >> there will be a lot of well wishing from merry christmas to happy new year, but what exactly is happiness? >> that's a very good question. we went ahead and ask anyway. here are some of the answers we got. ♪ >> being have been means unexpected things happen and change live in ways, not for yourself but also for your family, the enviro
will start working on a google tablet. samsung still leads by a wide par engine in europe. two places where you can track santa's trip tonight one is the website of norad, and the other site is google. >> google has their google.com/ santatrackersite where you can track santa and play games. >> google also asks you to send santa a >>> a very good morning and merry christmas eve to everyone coming up on 4:42 you are looking live at san francisco from the embarcadero almost like a series of christmas trees out there. mike will let us know what the weather is going to be like. we get a break from the storm. >>> this is it, your last day to shop before christmas. normally stores would be packed with procrastinators, this year things are different. kira klapper is live in the newsroom. >> reporter: a little bit of a grim start. shoppers aren't turning out no droves as they have in years past. [ unintelligible ] factors have led to a mute approach to holiday shopping bad news for retailers it can be good for all of us, retailers are doing all they can to entice us with unprecedented sales and ext
that -- in the man's life, how did that challenge you, how did that shape europe? >> you never know how much you are leaning on someone until they die. utch, and i had to bite the bullet and pull up my bootstraps and start stepping. all the other guys in the band are wondering, what do we do now. everybody knew -- they did not know what the solution was, but they knew if we did not keep playing there was no telling what would happen. we were playing in 1970. i think we played 306 nights. people ask you all the time, how did you make it? how did you know when you made it. i am not sure what that is, but we just got around and played everywhere we could. we were in new orleans on saturday night. we would look for a park on sunday and go set up -- we had a collection of these extension cords. we would see if there were a couple of consuls who would let us plug in, and then we would have -- a couple of souls who would let us plug in, and we would have of them. tavis: you still love playing? >> yes, sir. tavis: you said a moment ago, i do not know what made it means. i assume you had to make it -- yo
here or in europe. >> i heard that even if he distances himself he can contribute to contribute as a real leader to our country, because our country is in are really difficult situation. i hope that he can do something positive. >> campaigning for the elections will start officially. in the end, he may be called again to lead the country out of the economic crisis. al jazeera, rome. >> still to come -- security remains tight inside the egyptian presidential palace after the opposition rejects a referendum. and fired tear through a market in the afghan capital, destroying thousands of shops. we will back in just a few minutes. >> hello. the weather is looking pretty good over eastern brazil. the showers have drifted away over the heart of the amazon basin. 1 or two showers over the east. temperatures around 32 degrees. we will see highs around 30 celsius in buenos aires. pretty humid. i would not be surprised if we caught a rumble or two of thunder. you could see some temperatures around 26 celsius in santiago. we're seeing some rather wet weather. showers drifting away across ve
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
the globe. >> letters from ecuador and all over europe. >> they aren't met from kris kringle. >> gabriela has an inoperable brain tuesday momple before going, this thoughtful fourth grader has an epiphany. she asked for letters to santa because macy's donates a dollar for every one. they blew past their goal of 10,000. 100,000 became 150 sparbgssp far -- 150,000 letters. they delivered this avalanche of love. >> it's pretty incredible. despite radiation treatment and chemo gay georgia -- gabriel was there for the total of letters. 240,983. but one more letter would be red. >> dear santa, i'm gabriela, the one with a tumor. make a wish has really touched me. >> you can hear her strength in every word. >> i want to say one more thing. this is my motto. you might have a bad day today but there's always a bright star you can look forward to tomorrow. look inside with your bright star. thank you. happy holidays. [cheers and applause] >> an idea ignited in a little girl's heart, traveled around the world and returned with the immeasurable gift of hope. and ge
off than those who had to work in the fields but i think that is a debatable subject. if europe fields laid you put in a grueling 14 hours a day but after work the night was your own. a house servant like paul jennings could be called upon any time to service those in the big house. of course for jennings the most galling part of it was when he had to go back to washington with dolley leaving his wife and children behind and after his wife died these are motherless children. i think that was his final motivating factor to say now, not later. yes, sir. >> one thing i noticed about your book is it seems to tie historical parks that don't appear to be related. the rescue of the great painting of george washington. it has occurred to me for a long time that by stating that in addition to the fact that it is a great work, it would have retarded what later became the arc of u.s./british reconciliation. that is not the purpose of your book but has that occurred to you? it has occurred to me for some time. >> they will indeed have enjoyed defiling the image of the father of our country. >> may
in europe and we will go back. host: in 1940, mid 1940, he is prime minister of great britain. how big at that stage is the british empire? guest: well, it covered gee graphicically about a quarter of the left-hand mass and -- land mass and population. the population was about a quarter of the earth. india, subcontinent. commonwealth and dominion, canada, new zealand, ulster, northern ireland. host: hong kong, singapore? guest: oh, yes. host: how about africa? guest: they had a relationship with egypt. i thought going into this that they sort of controlled egypt. but the treaty allowed them to go in and administer the country or safeguard the suez canal and they did that. they had in south africa jan smuts and the republic of south africa. they had some somali land, some territories there that the italians just plucked from them. they were completely unprepared everywhere for war. and i think the british army plus the australian army of five or six divisions, new zealand and the canadians, all of them put together, even if they could all get it england were outnumbered by lhitler's arm
thim in europe and saw your grand daughter for the first time in there. >> governor, you know, we were and we wanted to see her while he was still in ethiopia and it didn't work out. we were going to land there and for security reasons we couldn't do it. i never staw marie until the awas in process and we were going back to the united states and my daughter and her husband. we met in germany and i saw this little girl and i knew immediately marie was going to be our grand daughter. i had no doubt about it i you hear about a match made in heaven. this was made in heaven. >> christmas time, and tell me what you are hoping happens for you this christmas? >> this christmas, i think i am really looked forward to putting up our nativity scene that my great grandfather maid. >> yes, sir he did. >> sounds like a wonderful family tradition. you i think it is interesting you didn't say you wanted for yourself but doing something as a family and honoring christ on his birth. it is obvious that the family that you have been placed into and chosen you is a very fram fam. senator, i just want to ask
. really appreciate it. >>> it's kind of a blue christmas across much of europe. we are talking about the government's cut back on spending. instead of helping, we'll tell you how it actually spread the recession there. are everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >> i'm saying to all of my family in trenton, njdz, i miss you all and love you all. if you missed, it's your fall. should have watched it. bye-bye. >> thank you for your service, car
'll go on working to make is as robust as possible. i mention the national interest europe on monday. triggered if there are emergency conditions, but i will look carefully at what he said. >> the prime minister told the house universal credit-card to put in work incentives for all people of -- all levels of income. why then does the department say universal credit will mean working women will consider getting off work? >> that is not the case at all. benefits together, what it means is people will always be better off in work and working extra hours. they have had 13 years to sort failed. >> mark spencer. pimped>> my constituent is currently stuck in cuba, despite having a british passport. i wonder if the prime minister could encourage cuban authorities to look with speed to try to get him back with his family for christmas. >> i understand why my friend raises this case -- he was born in cuba and entered the u.k., but obtained a british passport in 1997. we are in regular contact with the cuban authorities, who have advised him that he should expect to receive his cuban passports
that whirlwind trip through europe. i was along with her on that. and it was quite a hectic scheduled. after that, the stomach bug, which others had, also, on the trip. overcame her, and she suffered this concussion. it's not clear when she's capitocoming back. >> margaret, even people in the billion don't know. even people at the top levels of that department are also getting their news from the statements, know very little about what she's doing, how she's doing. and what a twist for her. this amazing run, unquestioned praisefor four years, and all of a sudden this bad report, sort of weird absence, politico today reporting that chelsea clinton troops in take a higher role in the next months. she's been doing some charity work through the clinton foundation sandy recovery. > recovery. >> schieffer: what is she going to do? is she going to run for something, too? >> a lot of democrats hoped she would run fair congressional seat. we're told that's not the case. but she'll be out there sort of as the clinton face, as-- >> this lack of disclosure i think is trouble responsible i really do think the
and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're creating a massive cash flow to homeowners in these countries and it's an investment that the homeowners are glad to take
. nowhere in europe had he experienced that. this technology was doing something to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of
this they lead by a wide margin in europe. there are two places to track santa's trip one is norad the military command center tracking st. nick for years and that's norad santa.org and joanna stern says the other site is google. >> google has a google.com/santa tracker site where you can track santa and play fun games. >> reporter: google lets you ask santa to send a friend or relative a message. murray christmas. those -- merry christmas. those are your tech bites, i am rob nelson. w=!n hey, look! a shooting star! make a wish! i wish we could lie here forever. i wish this test drive was over, so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. test drive! but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> people in chile and argentina are watching a volcano that stratels a border -- straddles a border. it has been seen spewing smoke and
market. samsung with only 42%. samsung still leads by a wide margin in europe. two places where you can track santa. the web site of norad, the military command center. noradsanta.org. the other website is google. >> and you can play fun and games on that website. >> you can send a friend or relative a message. i rob nelson. >> fedex field is the place to be this coming sunday night. that's when the redskins will host the cowboys before the final game of the season >> . if the redskins win, they will clinch the nfc east. they are one win away from of a division title spanx to yesterday's victory against the eagles. rgiii was 16 of 24 for 198 yards as the redskins won their sixth game in a row, 27-20.. kickoff sunday night is at 8:20. should be a good time. >> the redskins -- for this now. touchdown. seattle quarterback russell wilson continues to keep pace with andrew luck and r.g. iii. wilson growing four touchdown passes in their defeat over san francisco sunday night. the seattle seahawks clinched a playoff berth with the victory. part the ravens sealed the afc north with a victory o
during the holidays, but a long history of medicinal uses in europe. used for everything from headaches to cancer, supposedly enhance the immune functioning. which really is not -- what do you think? >> if it works and why not. a lot. so maybe we should be legalizing all of it. melissa: over centuries mistletoe has been used as a cure all and kind of like a folk remedy, but sometimes when you hear about old-time folk remedies that iran might use are recommended, they are the best things for what ails you. now they are doing serious research. melissa: it could be just the kissing that is helping. have we isolated it from the mistletoe? >> the new leaders of the germans took the fun out of it. there were feeding its people. melissa: i see. thank you for clean that up. the national dual log. blaze for more than 50 years. this year the layout of the holiday display was in serious -- mysteriously changed. there was a chance the fire will be rekindled next year. what do you think about this? >> such a bummer. such a huge holiday tradition for so many people who go down to washington and take
't. this is not a controversial technology. it's used in europe, okay? if it's used in europe, it's not a controversial technology. [laughter] that was not allowed. secondly, at the last minute they ordered a switch from multidose to single-of dose vials. why? the reason is because single-dose vials have less thimerosal, the chemical which contains a little bit of mercury that the anti-vaccine crowd says this causes autism, okay? in 2009 this has been thoroughly debunked for years, and yet obama's fda gave in to that. and partially, as a result, we had a vaccine shortage. what was the outcome of the 2009 h1n1 innewspaper wednesday saw? 61 million americans ended up becoming infected, 274,000 hospitalizations and 12,370 deaths. now, i'm not a person who says barack obama killed all those people. i don't believe that. okay? i don't believe the fda killed all those people. but i do believe that our bad policies contributed to this outcome. and how many of these illnesseses and deaths -- and think of the money involved, the billions of dollars in health care costs that we just wasted simply because we weren't prepare
. james rose in with a live report . the fiscal cliff fallback plan fails. mr. president of europe. it's your turn to lead. >> the president and congress take action, tax rates will go up on every american taxpayer and devastating defense cuts will go into effect in ten days. how we get their god only knows. lou: chief economist joining us with perspectives on what is next for the markets, the ♪ lou: ten days until the fiscal clef. that's right. still counting. the market sell-off today on no solution and moody's chief economist and bedfrd of adviser and chairman ceo harvey eisen will join us in moments to make all of this rational and understandable. first, and the "moneyline," investors expressed disappointment in the republican failure to pass plan be by selling stocks of around the world. certainly adding to the drama today, a day in which four kinds of options expire, and that is expected a quadruple preaching day, plunging on the open, fighting its way back, ending with a loss of 121 points. that sounds lousy, but it is better than it had been. the s&p down just over 13, nasdaq
, india, europe, china, who wanted to stay here after they graduated and work on their companies, create new start-ups, but they were unable to do so because after you graduate you get a job with an existing company or you leave and for many them that was not a good option and they left and took their ideas and companies with them. >> so they get their fancy education here and go back to indian or somewhere else. >>guest: we would like to stem the tide and keep them closer, and bring them back to the united states so they can create new jobs. and new companies. >> if they worked for a company they could have stayed? >>guest: if you get sponsored by a large corporation you can get the prop visas to work in the country but you cannot self sponsor and you cannot be here and create your own start-ups without going through some pretty significant legal work. >> to build this big ship where people live cost as lot of money and people are actually giving you money for this? >>guest: the face book funder and creator of pay pay pal is helping us and bringing in a number of investors. he will give
and jimmy went to ethiopia, they were able to get marie there, but you met them in europe and saw your granddaughter for the first time there. tell me about that moment. >> yeah. well, governor, you know, we wanted to see her while she was still in ethiopia and didn't work out. we were going to land and couldn't for security reasons, couldn't do it. i never saw marie until as you said the adoption was in process and we were going back to the united states and my daughter and her husband, we met in germany. and i saw this little girl and i knew immediately when i saw her, marie was going to be our granddaughter, you i had no doubt about it and it's one of these things that it's just, you know, you hear about a match made in heaven, well, this was made in heaven. >> all right, marie, i've got to ask you, it's christmas time. tell me what you're hoping happens for you this christmas. >> this christmas, i think i'm really looking forward to putting up our nativity scene that my great grandfather made. >> he actually made it. >> yes, sir, he did. sounds like a wonderful tradition. and it's
saudi arabia and ecuador and europe. >> most of them are one kid writing one letter at a time. >> reporter: they read like dreams instead of superficial demands. >> dear santa, i wish gabrielle's wishes would come true. >> they aren't meant for chris kringle at all. >> merry christmas and happy hanukkah. i love you, gabriella. >> reporter: only a month ago, the friends learned their vivacious daughter had an inoperable brain tumor. thanks to make a wish foundation, gabriella gets to travel to paris; but before going, this fourth grader had a selfless epiphany. she asked for leters to santa. macy's donate a dollar for every letter received. gabriella said other girls struggling like her -- >> every night i burst into tears. >> i will not stop praying for you. >> reporter: they blew past their goal of 10,000. >> each bag probably has a few thousands letter ins in it. >> reporter: social immediate i don't made it a reality. >> really buoyed her spirits which otherwise might have felt lonely and dark. >> then all expectations were shattered. one hundred thousands became 150,00
of europe in 1848 was in flames about whether or not they were going to have democracies or monarchies. and the world didn't know yet whether or not democracy was simply another name for chaos. and the coherence of a people's government which is what he saying in the gettysburg address was an important thing to prove, not just that we could create a government of the people, but that it could endure a terrible test. and i think that he felt that to have the war end without slavery being eliminated -- >> once and for all, not just with the emancipation proclamation-- >> -- had once and for all, right. >> -- but by the constitution. >> right, and i think that you see how important that was to him and that he tried to and succeeded in getting the house to pass it, at the same to keep his party which was enormously, it's the like democratic party today, it's blue dog democrats, there were sort of blue dog republicans. half the republican party was conservative and weren't sure that they liked, they were anti-slavery but they believed in sort of gradual emancipation over they, thought that
, in europe, in africa, in the caribbean, and in america, especially in america where it had the impact of radicalizing the abolitionist movement, and by that i mean that more and more people began to recognize that the resistance of enslaved people was crucial to abolition. they began during the time of the rebellion to quote a famous line from lord byron. this is repeated again and again and again running all the way up to the civil war, and that line was those who would be free must themselves strike the first blow. in other words, action from below can be a trigger. this had a very dramatic impact op a lot of leading african-american intellectuals like henry highland-garnett, frederick douglass and had a big effect on a man named john brown who wanted to strike the first blow at harpers ferry. i guess this is the final thought i leave you with. one of the most remarkable things about movements from below is that they are unpredictable. you never know when they are going to arise or how. these -- these things that rise up, these demands for justice, these demands for equality, these
will be the finest army in europe and we will go back." >> in 1949 -- he is -- 1939, 1940, he is prime minister. how big is the british power at that point? >> it was about a quarter of the world's population. india, the subcontinent's. the commonwealth. and australia, new zealand, canada. ulster, northern ireland's. >> hongkong and singapore? >> yes. >> how about africa? but they had a relationship with egypt -- >> they had a relationship with egypt. i thought they sort of control egypt going into this. but the deal was come up they administered the country to safeguard the suez canal. they did that. in south africa, they had the republic of south africa. and they had some somalis were land, territories there that the -- completely unprepared everywhere for war. and i think that the british army plus the australian army had five or six divisions. the canadians -- all of them put together, even if they could all get to england were outnumbered by hitler's army 7 or 821. but they weren't in england ready to go. they were all around the world. the australians and british and singapore when that fell.
pbs station from viewers like you. hi, i'm rick steves, and it's christmas time in europe. from manger scenes to mistletoe, from norway to rome, we're celebrating all over the continent. buon natale! froehliche weihnachten! joyeux noel!
plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> since we announced we were going to have the nra's wayne lapierre on the program, we received so much feedback on line, more than 40,000 saw this post alone. we'll continue to monitor that conversation online. tell us what you saw on the interview at facebook.com/meetthepress or on twitter. in the meantime, we're going to find out what these two gentlemen thought when >>> we're back with senator chuck schumer of new york and lindsey graham. senator schumer, your reaction to wayne lapierre. he is saying any attempt the president makes at gun control legislation is bound to fail because it won't work and it's just a bunch of old arguments. how do you react? >> i think he's so extreme and so tone deaf that he actuall
, europe, and then he is going to come to north america, follow-up to south america. we expect santa based on our experience of tracking him and obviously we don't control where he goes, but we just know that he likes to stop between country 9:00 and midnight at every home -- >> that's the best time. all the kids need to be in bed before 9:00 p.m. tonight, so parents mark your clocks. major general, thank you for taking time out for us. we appreciate it. >> all right, thomas. my pleasure. merry christmas to you and your team there. >> thank you so much. back at you. that's going to wrap things up for me this hour. thanks so much. in the next hour i'm going to have a chance to speak with democratic congresswoman karen bass. is she hopeful that a fiscal cliff deal will be struck before the new year? (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana sea
that made our world a smaller place. we supported the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ ♪ that's why new dove style + care whipped cream mousse nourishes and conditions to help keep curls well defined and touchably soft. new dove style + care whipped cream mousse. better style through better care. >>> we're back with senator chuck schumer of new york and lindsey graham. senator schumer, your reaction to wayne lapierre. he is saying any attempt the president makes at gun control legislation is bound to fail because it won't work and it's just a bunch of old arguments. how do you react? >> i think he's so extreme and so tone deaf that he actually helps the cause of us passing sensible gun legislation in the congress. look, he blames everything but
] >> in sweden, the smoking rate has dropped to the lowest in europe. many experts say smokeless products such as snus are a large factor. they are relatively inexpensive and contain more nicotine than the patch or gum. martin timell tried the patch and gum to stop smoking. but like 90% of smokers who do that each year, he failed. are you open about your snus use? >> yes, of course. >> there's no stigma whatsoever? >> no, none at all. >> timell, one of sweden's most popular tv hosts, smoked a pack a day for 15 years until his mother, a lifelong smoker, died of lung cancer. you said to yourself, "okay, that's it." >> yes. >> and you tried to stop smoking without snus? >> yes, i tried several times, and i didn't manage. maybe i'm a weak person. i don't know. but with snus, it was very, very easy. >> so you started snus and stopped smoking? >> yes. >> just like that? >> yes. >> because it satisfies the craving. >> oh, yes. >> but now instead of craving cigarettes, timell craves snus. so he still finds himself at the tobacco store every day feeding his habit. >> of course it would be much bet
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